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“Hey, we saw you in the keynote!”

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Last year we cheered when Arlington Visual Budget (AVB) won an Innovation Award from the Massachusetts Municipal Association (MMA). This past weekend the Visual Government (VisGov) team was back again for the MMA annual meeting to continue the conversation on open government. Arlington Town Finance Committee member Alan Jones reported that on Friday, the day started with people telling them that the keynote speaker, futurist Mike Walsh, had given AVB a shout-out along the lines of “the best thing he’s ever seen.” On Saturday, Arlington Town Manager Adam Chapdelaine demonstrated the software at the Mass Selectmen’s Association annual meeting where it was once again well received.

Situated at the event’s trade show, the VisGov team found themselves amongst a wide variety of local and national vendors, ranging from fire suppression systems to the Hampshire council of governments, along with the Massachusetts State Lottery, emergency services products, law firms, even vendors of street lights, parking meters, garbage cans, and social media apps to engage citizens.

Many attendees, who had already been introduced to AVB and were looking for more information, really seemed to “get it.” As Finance Committee member Annie LaCourt explains, “Elected officials and city and town financial managers see the need to be more transparent, so Visual Budget is a great tool to add to their tool box and they are very interested in working with us. They appreciate that we understand their pain.” Jones remarked that the Vis Gov team, orignators of Visual Budget, gathered many ideas for new features and functions that will add real value as they work on the next release. Updates will make it easier to instantiate the budget visualizations and enable municipalities to easily sign up and upload their data to set up their own VB instantiation.

Along with the city of Asheville NC, Massachusetts towns that are adopting and adapting the AVB app include Mansfield, Newburyport, Melrose, Cohassett, and Bourne. All of these efforts bring intelligence and energy to the VisGov mission to transform financial transparency for municipalities.

About VisGov and Involution Studios

VisGov is a working group that has emerged from the award-winning Arlington Visual Budget project, with diverse backgrounds in technology, software engineering, user experience design, and municipal finance. Along with technical partner Involution Studios, VisGov provides web-based, interactive graphical tools that help cities and towns convey the “story” of a municipality’s policies and priorities and establish credibility and support through transparency and openness.

New to the open source tools in Visual Budget? Read about AVB’s origins.

You may remember our work with the Town of Arlington to produce the award-winning Arlington Visual Budget, an open source web application that creates an easier way to communicate complex municipal financial information. The app has been well-recieved here in Arlington and is being explored by other communities as far away as Asheville, North Carolina.

Last summer, working with the code from Arlington Visual Budget (AVB), volunteers from Code for Asheville and the City of Asheville collaborated in an experiment in civic engagement and open government. They were motivated by the same principles that drove the work on AVB, wanting to contribute to “the conversation within the Asheville community and between the community and the government which serves it." 

First Steps

Asheville-vis-budget-early

Initially the AVLBudget app closely resembled the first release of Arlington Visual Budget. It was based on the AVB code, which the Asheville developers had come across via Code for America.

Engineer Eric Jackson of DemocracyApps recently spoke with Invo developer Craig McGinley about his work on the Asheville project. He explained that they streamlined and changed the design of the AVB, adding new features like a “What’s New” section, which displays recent budget changes, and a Resources section that includes “gory details” such as descriptions of the budget and organizational structure. Prominent buttons saying “How do I get involved?” and “Let me contribute to the conversation” encourage and facilitate citizen engagement.

Making it Asheville’s Own

Asheville_AVLbudget

The current iteration of the Asheville, NC City Budget app.

According to Eric Jackson, this project and others like it don’t just passively present data to citizens. They give more than answers—they prompt and encourage questions and individual involvement in local government. By connecting open data to people’s lives, such efforts enable citizens to learn, both from data they see and from data that is missing. Like the Arlington Visual Budget project, the Asheville team intends to expand government transparency app use and development. And, like Involution Studios and the Town of Arlington, the City of Asheville will continue to work with their technical team to update and improve these innovative open government tools.

Seal_of_Asheville,_North_Carolina

As the news has spread in all directions we have discovered that the 2014 Ebola outbreak represents not only a healthcare crisis with global impact, but also an information crisis. Even highly respected news outlets can have conflicting information on a single event, so that the stories are confusing and hard to trust. Hours spent poring over the NIH and CDC and WHO sites revealed the common threads of truth, but the details were scattered. There was no straightforward way to get a complete picture.

So, we decided to create a single source of graphical information that could become an international resource. Something that could compliment the Wikipedia page. Clean lines, a classic readable font, with unambiguous colors and icons. Headers in black and white, red for critical information, gray text to let pictures do the talking. Easy to scan and locate the topics before reading closely for details.

For designer Xinyu Liu, sifting through and digesting the massive information set was a great challenge, as was creating the graphics based on what she learned. It took time as well to select and refine icons for readability and simplicity. A fully articulated timeline had to be scrapped because it simply didn't show all of the information. Then came distilling the language for brevity and clarity, fact-checking to make sure we had the country names correct, as African politics have shifted since the virus was first identified, and researching to ensure clinical accuracy. 

We worked quickly to get the graphic out into public view. Waiting to get it perfect was not the plan. It is an image for now—it’s not yet searchable nor dynamic. We need lots of eyes on it, the eyes of people who are far more aware of what is currently happening and how it all began: doctors, healthcare workers, policy makers, scientists, and others in the field. We are continually gathering feedback, updating, and reposting. The scientific method at its best: ideate, model, test, repeat.

The first draft of this document was put together in under two weeks. Here is a peek at how that happened.

red-ebola

A single page from Xinyu's sketchbook contains the challenge in a nutshell: overwhelming data in a broad range of topics, from geopolitical divisions to chronology, the nature of the virus, rates of incidence and deaths, and more. Color codes and graphs are beginning to take shape even while information is still coming in.

death-rate

A detail of the timeline that now clearly tells the story of each outbreak since 1976 with geographical locations, rates of cases and deaths, and a summary of how the infection began and spread in each case. The timeline also indicates points at which new strains of the virus were identified.

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Gathering epidemiological data, developing the context for the narrative of the current outbreak.

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Working with feedback to improve visual consistency, and, later, understanding the concept of viral load to add new information from an external reviewer.

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Here we see the finely tuned visualization of the information in the previous two sketches, used to convey the dramatic differences in viral load among several devastating diseases.

Involution Studios is a tiny company. We are not an NGO nor a non-profit. We are, however, deeply committed to designing great healthcare and changing people’s behavior for better health (hence, the Health Axioms). We want to understand what is happening with Ebola, and we want to make it easier to share that knowledge. So we created Understanding Ebola: A Visual Guide as an open-source project that we are distributing as widely as possible. We invite feedback and we will continue to update and improve it as healthcare professionals send us better information.

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Dirk Knemeyer has a few questions about Apple's ideas for a mobile medical solution.

This coming June, Apple is expected to announce their “Healthbook” app. In a bold expansion on the concepts of Involution’s hGraph app, Apple is attempting not only to federate all of a user’s important, top-level health and wellness data but also to synchronize with hardware devices that do everything from analyze blood to count steps to monitor heart rate.

Healthbook mockup

Mockup of Healthbook screen published to Behance this past February.

hGraph, your health in one picture

hGraph, the only open source visualization for your complete health, developed by Involution Studios.

There is an enormous need for this kind of software. Right now hundreds of companies are shipping devices that collect or track health and wellness information, but locking that data into proprietary interfaces that they are trying to monetize in order to sustain a business. This bottom-up approach worked in validating the market, but it is not at all consumer-friendly in the aggregate. It is too hard for a user who knows how all of his or her different services work to get a good picture, let alone a doctor or emergency healthcare professional. Having one software interface where all of your data is tracked and displayed is clearly the correct solution. Someone certainly needs to do it. The question is, is Apple the right company to be doing it?

Emphatically: No, for three reasons.

  1. Apple is terrible at software. Can you name one piece of software that Apple makes which is really excellent? From iTunes to Mail to Pages to iCloud, one is worse than the other. OS X? Used to be the best, largely thanks to engineering, not design, but as they try to unify their desktop and mobile operating systems and user experience, it gets worse every day. Keynote? OK, I will grant you Keynote. But Apple has a long track record of being astonishingly good at hardware and cover-your-eyes-bad at software. Maybe they get it right here—I hope they do—but as my Mail app continues to misbehave and iCloud remains unusable after more than a decade of trying, I can’t fathom that they will.
  2. Health information access needs to be universal and consistent, not specific to mobile OS providers. Apple, Google, and Microsoft are locked in a battle for digital supremacy. Rather than search for solutions that are complementary they are each trying to create their own OS, their own devices, and their own mapping programs. If they are now also providing their own Healthbook equivalents, it could present a serious challenge. Do we expect healthcare professionals to train up on three different software environments? What happens to your Apple data if you change to Microsoft, will it be lost or just offline and not integrated? Do these shortsighted competitors have the vision to cooperate?
  3. Apple’s parochial interests will stifle innovation. The totality of this picture is a complex one. Apple, correctly, is trying to bring together a tremendous amount of health data and information from potentially very different sources and devices. Meanwhile, they are rapidly patenting various hardware, software, and input and output mechanisms aimed at the rapidly expanding mobile medical device market. Each success brings Apple closer to developing a Healthbook that is more proprietary, less universal, and infinitely less useful in the long-term and/or outside of the Apple bubble.

Ideally this sort of software would be created by an international non-profit focused solely on health and wellness as part of a blueprint for healthful humanity. Among their initiatives they would make this sort of top-order software as accessible and transferable and standardized as possible. Of course, there is no such organization. It seems like an obvious thing to be funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, but how much Microsoft stock does the Family Gates still hold? Around and around we go.

About Involution’s Health Design Practice
For almost 10 years, Involution has been building software for health companies of every shape and size, from household names like AstraZeneca and Walgreens, to research leaders like the Personal Genome Project and Partners HealthCare. We also work with the most exciting and progressive health startups. We’ve made digital healthcare our top focus.

Arlington Visual Budget recognized for innovation, value, and impact.

BOSTON, MAInvolution Studios today announced its Arlington Visual Budget has been selected as a finalist in the Best Doing Good Innovation - Product and Most Insightful: Big Data and Analytics Innovations - Product categories for the MITX What’s Next Awards. This year MITX combined its annual Innovation and Interactive Awards into a single show recognizing Boston’s entire digital ecosystem.

Since 1996 the MITX Award shows have grown to become the largest and most prestigious awards competitions in the country for marketing innovations, celebrating the best creative and technological accomplishments emerging from New England.

“The finalists that emerged from an unprecedented number of submissions received for this year’s MITX What’s Next Awards demonstrate the creativity and innovation of our region’s rich digital ecosystem,” says MITX Board Member and Communispace Chief Operating Officer Howard Kogan, who serves as Chairman of the MITX What’s Next Awards Advisory Committee. “From startups to large corporations and everything in between, the individuals behind this work continue to raise the bar for the entire digital community.”

Arlington Visual Budget

AVB provides the next generation of accessibility in financial information that enables citizens to see, engage, and discuss.

The Visual Budget system converts the town of Arlington's revenues and expenditures to simple graphics and charts that describe Arlington’s finances. It also provides definitions for complex budgeting terminology, and includes a tool where residents can input their yearly property tax bill and find out exactly how the town spends their tax dollars. Taxpayers can learn about town revenues, expenses, and funds displayed in both graphical and tabular formats. What’s more, the system enables users to provide feedback and ideas, an essential component of empowering citizens with both information and a greater voice in decision-making.

Town Management Analyst Michael Bouton said he was happy to work with Involution’s creative team on the project. “It was a blank canvas,” Bouton said. “We came in with an idea and the conceptualization of it was them.” Involution designers Roger Zhu and Ivan Dilernia donated their time, and the company has made the code for the project available online for other town governments to use. An Arlington resident, Involution’s Creative Director Juhan Sonin was excited about the collaboration, saying “It’s a part of our civic responsibility as designers to get involved in the design of policy.”

Involution Studios will be recognized with the other finalists in the Best Doing Good Innovation - Product and Most Insightful: Big Data and Analytics Innovations - Product categories at a gala awards ceremony traditionally attended by over 1,000 of the region’s top interactive marketing and technology professionals. Winners will be announced at a ceremony at the Westin Waterfront Hotel on May 29th.
Purchase tickets for the Awards Ceremony

About Involution Studios
Involution designs and builds exceptional software for innovative and visionary companies. We deploy small and experienced teams to create applications that are highly usable and appropriately beautiful. Our client list includes Apple, AstraZeneca, McAfee, Microsoft, Oracle, PayPal, Shutterfly, and Yahoo. For more information please contact info@goinvo.com or +1 617 803 7043.

About MITX
Established in 1996, MITX — the Massachusetts Innovation & Technology Exchange — is the leading industry organization focused on the web and mobile, bringing together the digital marketing, media and technology community to engage in what's next and how it will impact the marketing and business worlds. Connecting more than 7,500 professionals in New England, MITX is a dynamic community of thought leaders and collaborators in search of insight, education and opportunity. Creator of FutureM, MITX is headquartered in Boston, MA.

NPR Health Axioms Story

Involution's Health Axioms are grabbing the attention of the health innovation community.

NPR Health Blogger Nancy Shute posted her impressions of the Health Axioms recently in If A Picture's Worth 1,000 Words, Could It Help You Floss?

After getting her own Health Axioms in the mail — with a personal note — Shute called Involution's Juhan Sonin, one of the creative minds behind the deck. She had spread the cards on her desk at work and watched her co-workers' reactions, which ranged from "Health tarot cards!" to "But who are they for?" Not surprisingly, Sonin was frank in saying that the decks reflect a first-release "primordial ooze stage" and that he hopes to get feedback and ideas from a broad audience. Given the number of responses already posted to this one article it's clear that people want to talk about health and want to be heard.

Shute lets the cards speak for themselves by including several images from the deck, summing them up as not Crazy Eights but having their own "geeky charm," even with Manga-style illustrations reminiscent of "Soviet propaganda posters (but in a nice way)"(!) She let colleagues bring them home, reporting both delight (from a 10-year-old) and shrugs of indifference (from teens). She was puzzled by two of the axioms ("Know Your Numbers," "Who Is Your Wingman?") and demonstrates how quickly these two became worth the small effort of reading the card backs.

Read Shute's blog post. Check out the Health Axioms. Let us know your thoughts.

Learn more about/order Health Axioms.

About Involution’s Health Design Practice
For almost 10 years, Involution has been building software for health companies of every shape and size, from household names like AstraZeneca and Walgreens, to research leaders like the Personal Genome Project and Partners HealthCare. We also work with the most exciting and progressive health startups. We’ve made digital healthcare our top focus.

Dirk Knemeyer on multimedia information design.

Over the past month numerous news outlets--CNN in particular--have devoted extensive coverage to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370. While the story is certainly a tragedy, the degree to which its coverage has eclipsed that of stories like the Ukraine situation is a little curious. Regardless, what really raised my ire most recently was CNN’s featured homepage graphic related to the lost plane saga, shown here.

Health Axioms Sketches

The image that CNN featured in their April 7 homepage headline on was a screen capture from one of the videos associated with the story. Source: Malaysia Flight 370: 'Our optimism is fading away, ever so slightly' By Tom Watkins, CNN. April 7, 2014.

This is an example of some of the worst information design I’ve recently seen in such a prominent and frequently visited position on a major news site.

Let us examine the many problems here:

Because everything is important, nothing is important. No less than six pieces of data are put into boxed backgrounds and presented with some form of blaring text. What is really important? Where should the reader look? There is no information hierarchy here.

Fonts, fonts, so many fonts! There are (at least) eight different fonts being used on this graphic, if we count font type, size, color, and style. This inconsistency exacerbates the muddying of importance and hierarchy that was already introduced via other display techniques.

Superfluous information clutters a very small space, further undermining comprehension. The yellow callouts contain too much specific information to go with a headline. The lines showing mileage lack context when viewed outside of the video. At a glance, the combined elements serve to make ambiguous what the “Planned Search Areas April 7” are, which is a real problem!

And onward… Presumably the proper order of importance should be:

  1. Focus on the fact that there are search areas planned for April 7 and indicate where those areas will be. The copy in the current box is correct, but it should relate to the red highlight boxes in color presentation, not the completely unrelated white/black that is currently used (and which is also redundant with the cognitively unrelated AUSTRALIA box). Moving this “Search Areas” callout to the upper left of the graphic would also bring it spatially proximate to the actual spots it is calling out to.
  2. Identify the spots where signals were detected. This should be done with a single callout box that reads something like “Possible signals detected” pointing to both of the bulls-eye graphics. These elements should share a color palette to emphasize their relationship (so, green/back/white instead of yellow/black). This callout should be located in the lower left or lower middle to be spatially proximate to the actual spots it is calling out to.
  3. Clarify the purpose of showing the distance of each of the five ocean locations to Learmonth and Perth. If important, each of the five targets should clearly be pointed to instead of just the four lines shown (and some of those being ambiguous as to what they are pointing to and why). This needs consistency of treatment and clarity of purpose. Still, these are too detailed for a headline image and would be best simply left out.
  4. Make geographic elements consistent. The label identifiers for the relevant locations: Australia, Perth, Learmonth, and Indian Ocean should be presented more subtly, similar to “Indian Ocean” on the original graphic. They should be completely presented--not cut off as “Australia” and “Indian Ocean” are, or obscured like “Southern” in the lower right.

Here is our version of a redesign, from Involution designer Jen Patel:

Redesigned Planned Search Areas graphic.

A cleaner, clearer version of the "Planned Search Areas" graphic. Designed by Jen Patel.

Executing strong information design is not difficult, but as CNN has illustrated, very poor information design is unfortunately easier to fall into than we might like it to be. A well-crafted, succinct headline deserves a clean and clear graphic.

About Involution Studios
Involution designs and builds exceptional software for innovative and visionary companies. We specify, architect, design, and develop applications for web, mobile, desktop, devices, and emerging technologies. Involution deploys small and experienced teams to create applications that are highly usable and appropriately beautiful. Founded in 2004, complex, mission critical software has always been our business. We've produced high-quality applications that are being used every day by over 150 million people. Our clients include Apple, AstraZeneca, 3M Health Information Systems, McAfee, Microsoft, Oracle, Personal Genome Project, Partners HealthCare, and US Department of Health and Human Services.

37 Million Mile Data Challenge

Involution Principal Jon Follett has recently been selected to judge entries in the 37 Billion Mile Data Challenge, sponsored by The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, and the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative. Using data from the Massachusetts Vehicle Census, contest participants will have six weeks to determine why Massachusetts drivers burn up 37 billion miles each year, with the goal of discovering insights that can help the Commonwealth build a more efficient and sustainable transportation system.

“Particularly in the open government movement, information visualization has become an important method for making big data sets understandable, and stimulating discussion about critical issues,” says Follett. “Making data accessible helps people to spot patterns and trends and to approach problems in new ways — even getting answers to questions they hadn’t thought about before. Interactive designs make it possible to gain deeper insights that can lead to better decision making and more innovative solutions.” A seasoned designer, Follett has created data visualizations for AstraZeneca, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Survey Sampling International, among others.

Designers, researchers, analysts, and developers will work individually or in teams to come up with interactive visualizations, maps, infographics, and even games that reveal actionable information from the vehicle-use dataset. Data Challenge entries are due April 19 and the winners will be announced at an awards ceremony on May 1.

About Jon Follett
For nearly two decades Jon has been leading or contributing to Web application design and development for organizations ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Jon is a recognized thought leader and internationally published author on the topics of user experience and information design. He recently contributed a chapter, “The Beautiful People: Keeping Users in Mind When Designing Data Collection Methods” to Beautiful Data published by O’Reilly Media, Inc. He has written over 25 articles for industry publications such as UXmatters, Digital Web and A List Apart, and his work has been translated into a variety of languages.

For Immediate Release
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ARLINGTON, MA (U.S.) – February 7, 2014 - Online Budget Visualization Tool, Designed by Involution Studios with Town of Arlington, MA Offers Financial Transparency to Taxpayers

Arlington Visual Budget has been selected as a winner of the 2014 iF Communication Design award.

Since its introduction in 2004, the iF Communication Design award has been among the top national and international awards. Designs from advertising agencies, communication designers and their clients, manufacturers, designers, architects and interior architects face the jury judgment.

More than 1,000 entries were assessed according to criteria such as target audience-specific communication and content, design quality and creativity, customer relevance, cost effectiveness, originality and innovation. Of the 311 iF Communication Design award winners, Arlington Visual Budget was among only 20 that received the iF gold award in recognition for an outstanding work of communication design. They will be announced on 28 February 2014 during the awards ceremony in Munich (Germany).

In the fall of 2013, Involution Studios of Arlington, MA, along with the Town of Arlington and Finance Committee members Annie Lacourt and Alan Jones, conceptualized a web application that provides an easier way to communicate complex municipal financial information. Involution donated all development services for this project, the first known municipal budget visual representation of its kind.

The initiative exemplifies the nation’s commitment to the international Open Government Partnership (OGP), a global effort to encourage transparent, effective, and accountable governance. President Obama has challenged agencies to “harness new technologies” and “solicit public feedback to identify information of greatest use to the public” and emphasizes a “bottom-up” philosophy that taps citizen expertise to make government smarter and more responsive to private sector demands.

AVB screen
AVB provides the next generation of accessibility in financial information that enables citizens to see, engage, and discuss.

The Visual Budget system converts the town’s revenues and expenditures to simple graphics and charts that describe Arlington’s finances. It also provides definitions for complex budgeting terminology, and includes a tool where residents can input their yearly property tax bill and find out exactly how the town spends their tax dollars. Taxpayers can learn about town revenues, expenses, and funds displayed in both graphical and tabular formats. What’s more, the system enables users to provide feedback and ideas, an essential component of empowering citizens with both information and a greater voice in decision-making.

Town Management Analyst Michael Bouton said he was happy to work with Involution’s creative team on the project. “It was a blank canvas,” Bouton said. “We came in with an idea and the conceptualization of it was them.” Involution designers Roger Zhu and Ivan Dilernia donated their time, and the company has made the code for the project available online for other town governments to use. An Arlington resident, Involution’s Creative Director Juhan Sonin was excited about the collaboration, saying “It’s a part of our civic responsibility as designers to get involved in the design of policy.”

Read what the Sunlight Foundation says about how the Arlington Visual Budget will be used in 2014.

About Involution Studios
Involution designs and builds exceptional software for innovative and visionary companies. We deploy small and experienced teams to create applications that are highly usable and appropriately beautiful. Our client list includes Apple, AstraZeneca, McAfee, Microsoft, Oracle, PayPal, Shutterfly, and Yahoo. For more information please contact info@goinvo.com or +1 617 803 7043.

For Immediate Release

ARLINGTON, MA (U.S.) - January 17, 2014 - Online Budget Visualization Tool, Designed by Involution Studios with Town of Arlington, MA Offers Financial Transparency to Taxpayers

Arlington Visual Budget has been selected to receive the Massachusetts Municipal Association Innovation Award at the MMA Annual Meeting on January 25th in Boston.

Sponsored each year by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the Kenneth E. Pickard Municipal Innovation Award recognizes unique and creative projects and programs that increase the effectiveness of local government. Judged by former municipal officials, consultants, and professors, an innovation must address a problem that is common to municipalities across the Commonwealth in an original, cost-effective, and efficient way. Winning innovations must improve a municipal service, administration, or performance, while adaptability to other communities is also a consideration. This award lets municipalities recognize successfully established innovative programs or projects and to share these new, unique, and effective solutions with other cities and towns.

Last fall, Involution Studios of Arlington, MA, along with the Town of Arlington and Finance Committee members Annie Lacourt and Alan Jones, conceptualized a web application that provides an easier way to communicate complex municipal financial information. Involution donated all development services for this project, the first known municipal budget visual representation of its kind.

The initiative exemplifies the nation’s commitment to the international Open Government Partnership (OGP), a global effort to encourage transparent, effective, and accountable governance. President Obama has challenged agencies to “harness new technologies” and “solicit public feedback to identify information of greatest use to the public” and emphasizes a “bottom-up” philosophy that taps citizen expertise to make government smarter and more responsive to private sector demands.

Arlington Visual Budget

AVB provides the next generation of accessibility in financial information that enables citizens to see, engage, and discuss.

The Visual Budget system converts the town’s revenues and expenditures to simple graphics and charts that describe Arlington’s finances. It also provides definitions for complex budgeting terminology, and includes a tool where residents can input their yearly property tax bill and find out exactly how the town spends their tax dollars. Taxpayers can learn about town revenues, expenses, and funds displayed in both graphical and tabular formats. What’s more, the system enables users to provide feedback and ideas, an essential component of empowering citizens with both information and a greater voice in decision-making.

Town Management Analyst Michael Bouton said he was happy to work with Involution’s creative team on the project. “It was a blank canvas,” Bouton said. “We came in with an idea and the conceptualization of it was them.” Involution designers Roger Zhu and Ivan Dilernia donated their time, and the company has made the code for the project available online for other town governments to use. An Arlington resident, Involution’s Creative Director Juhan Sonin was excited about the collaboration, saying “It’s a part of our civic responsibility as designers to get involved in the design of policy.”

Read what the Sunlight Foundation says about how the Arlington Visual Budget will be used in 2014.

About Involution Studios

Involution designs and builds exceptional software for innovative and visionary companies. We deploy small and experienced teams to create applications that are highly usable and appropriately beautiful. Our client list includes Apple, AstraZeneca, McAfee, Microsoft, Oracle, PayPal, Shutterfly, and Yahoo. For more information please contact info@goinvo.com or +1 617 803 7043.

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